New York Student ( of Ghanian origin) Is Accepted To All 8 Ivy League Schools (top USA Colleges)

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Kwasi Enin Accepted To All 8 Ivy Leagues
Kwasi Enin Accepted To All 8 Ivy Leagues
The odds of getting into any of the eight Ivy League schools in the country are against even the brightest students in the country.

Imagine getting a yes from all of them. That’s what happened to 17-year-old Kwasi Enin of Shirley, N.Y.

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Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania and Yale have all asked Kwasi to be part of their class of 2018.

Long Island’s Newsday reports:

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“For Kwasi, applying to a competitive college wasn’t exactly a gamble. He has an SAT score of 2,250 out of 2,400, which places him in the 99th percentile for all students taking the exam. He has taken and scored high on many Advanced Placement exams. He is an athlete, a shot putter, in fact, and his baritone voice can belt out a tune when he’s not playing viola for the school orchestra.

“Still, he said, ‘I’ve never heard of someone getting all eight.’

“He has now surpassed the accomplishments of some of his uncles and cousins, who were accepted to several Ivies. ‘I always thought they were far better than me academically,’ Kwasi said.”

USA Today talked to Kwasi’s high school guidance counselor, who said her “heart skipped a beat” when Kwasi told her he was applying to all eight Ivies.

“It’s a big deal when we have students apply to one or two Ivies,” Nancy Winkler told the paper. “To get into one or two is huge. It was extraordinary.”

USA Today reports that Kwasi is a first-generation American. His parents emigrated from Ghana to the U.S. in the 1980s and both of them studied at local colleges to become nurses.

Kwasi hopes to become a physician. And which school might be graced with his presence?

His preference, he told Newsday, is Yale. But he is still weighing his options.

 

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In the life of a teenager, some hard decisions have to be made including who to take to prom, what clothes will get him/her noticed, how will college get paid for, etc. But next month, Kwasi Enin must make one of his toughest decisions: which of the eight Ivy League universities should he attend this fall?

That’s right, all eight Ivy League schools are courting him. A first-generation American from Shirley, N.Y., the 17-year-old violist and aspiring physician applied to all eight, from Brown to Yale.

The responses began rolling in over the past few months, and by late last week when he opened an e-mail from Harvard, he found he’d been accepted to every one. School district officials provided scanned copies of acceptance letters from all eight on Monday. Yale confirmed that it was holding a spot for Enin.

The feat is extremely rare, say college counselors — few students even apply to all eight, because each seeks different qualities in their freshman class. Almost none are invited to attend them all. The Ivy League colleges are among the nation’s most elite.

“My heart skipped a beat when he told me he was applying to all eight,” says Nancy Winkler, a guidance counselor at William Floyd High School, where Enin attends class. In 29 years as a counselor, she says, she’s never seen anything like this. “It’s a big deal when we have students apply to one or two Ivies. To get into one or two is huge. It was extraordinary.”

For most of the eight schools, acceptance comes rarely, even among the USA’s top students. At the top end, Cornell University admitted only 14% of applicants. Harvard accepted just 5.9%.

 

He ranks No. 11 in a class of 647 at William Floyd, a large public school on Long Island’s south shore. That puts him in the top 2% of his class. His SAT score, at 2,250 out of 2,400 points, puts him in the 99th percentile for African-American students.

He will also have taken 11 Advanced Placement courses by the time he graduates this spring. He’s a musician who sings in the school’s a capella group and volunteers at Stony Brook University Hospital’s radiology department. Enin plans to study medicine, as did both of his parents. They emigrated to New York from Ghana in the 1980s and studied at public colleges nearby. Both are nurses.

Being a first-generation American from Ghana also helps him stand out, Cohen says. “He’s not a typical African-American kid.”

Enin says he got the idea to apply to all eight in 10th or 11th grade, discovering that each has “their own sense of school spirit” and other qualities he liked. He also applied to three State University of New York campuses and Duke — and yes, they have all accepted him.

Cohen says he’s “sitting in a very good place right now — I think he can negotiate the very best financial aid package he can get” at his top-choice school. “Almost any of them would do anything for this type of candidate,” Cohen says.

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